Rabbit Advocacy Animal Matters

 

November 1, 2007 Companion Animal Welfare Fund

Bill: SB 347 Sponsored by: Sen. Patricia Birkolz
Bill: SB 350 Sponsored by: Sen. Valde Garcia

MHS Position: SUPPORT

Current Status: SB 350 passed both the House and the Senate and has been signed by the Governor!

SB 350, also known as The Companion Animal Welfare Fund, has been signed into law by the Governor! This is a major victory for animals and animal welfare organizations in Michigan. The Michigan Humane Society is proud to have been actively involved in the development and success of this bill.

This law will allow taxpayers to either designate a portion of their state income tax refund, or make a voluntary donation, to a new interest-bearing Companion Animal Welfare Fund in the state Treasury. The fund would make monetary grants to animal welfare groups for implementing innovative animal sterilization and adoption programs in our state.

Many areas of our state have only small shelters or foster based humane societies with very limited resources. This law will provide animal welfare groups across Michigan the opportunity to receive funding for critical programs they otherwise could not afford.

MHS recognizes that strong adoption and sterilization programs are key components in ending companion animal homelessness. With the passage of this bill, we believe we are now one step closer to reaching that goal. Thank you for your support of this important legislation!

Comment:  Hopefully this will set a precedent and other states and provinces will follow suit.  Animal welfare issues are of concern to all society.  Keep fighting the good fight!


Comment: It is of paramount importance that we keep speaking out for the protection and humane treatment of all species. Our crimes against animals are truly despicable, and legislation on all levels needs to be modernized. Please do your part in forcing change and in demanding justice for the innocent. Animals matter! The following are petitions from May, 2010. 

Protect Domestic Animals from Abuse: Add on to the Animal Welfare Act 

Target: U.S. Congress Sponsored by: Care2 

The Animal Welfare Act is designed to protect animals from mistreatment. But it doesn't cover an individual's abuse of domestic animals -- a crime that too often is not taken seriously.

David Ramsey, who beat and killed his dachshund puppy Junior, was convicted of aggravated animal cruelty, a felony, but given only a four-month jail sentence by a New York judge.

Crimes like Ramsey's are correlated with other serious offenses: for example, there is a strong link between abusing animals and committing domestic violence. This is Ramsey's second animal cruelty conviction, and upon hearing his sentence he reportedly just shrugged it off. In four U.S. states, animal cruelty carries no possible felony sentence; so his crime would have been considered only a misdemeanor in those states.

Add on to the Animal Welfare Act to protect domestic animals from individual acts of abuse. Animal cruelty should have a possible felony conviction in all 50 states; a minimum sentence for such abuse should be set; and individuals convicted of these crimes should not be allowed to own animals.

USDA:  Animal Welfare Act

Support International Guidelines for Humane Animal Treatment 

Target: United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon
Sponsored by: Care2 

Animals all over the world are victims of cruelty and abuse.

The nations of the world must unite and create international guidelines for the treatment of animals.

Different countries with their various customs naturally treat animals differently. An international law can take into account cultural differences that affect the treatment of animals in different countries and create base standards of humane treatment. Gandhi said, "the greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way it treats its animals." Guidelines for humane animal treatment would further the greatness of all nations, and help promote moral progress worldwide.

I urge you to look into the creation of a universal declaration of animal rights that will set basic standards for humane treatment of the world's animals.

Federal legislation in Canada: Canada is widely considered to be a progressive, civilized country with plenty of laws on the books to protect its citizens from various forms of violence, disorderly conduct and theft. But we have a dismal record when it comes to protecting animals from cruelty, abuse and neglect. That could change with your help. Find out more on the Canadian Federation of Humane Societies page.